© 2017 Sunrise Gardens LLC           203 E Beloit St Darien, WI 53114     

pollinator gardens

Improve Fruits and Vegetables by Attracting Pollinators

If you have a vegetable garden or fruit trees and shrubs, they will benefit from pollinator-friendly plants nearby. If you find you have poor yields, especially with cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, or typical fruit trees- increased pollination may help. Including (but not limited to) Sweet Alyssum (annual) Mint family (catmint, mints, basil... Carrot family (carrots, parsley, dill...) Aster family (asters, sunflowers, zinnia...)

 Why are Pollinators Important?

75% of all of our food crops require or benefit from insect pollination Pollinators are disappearing at alarming rates because of disease, habitat loss, and pesticide use. Bees are the most well known pollinators, but there are also many species of butterflies, moths, flies, wasps, beetles, birds, bats, and even some mammals.

Use Your Landscape to

help pollinators

Eliminate or reduce your pesticide use Add to your landscape flowering plants that attract pollinators Provide a water source- even a small birdbath or small water feature will help

Monarch Butterflies

The Monarch is one of our most recognizable American butterflies. Loss of habitat and food supply have greatly decreased the population of this amazing migrating butterfly. Fortunately, we can do something to help this species, and all pollinators by planting pollinator friendly gardens. There are even funds for schools, communities, and businesses to aid in Monarch conservation efforts (more info here).

Creating a Monarch Friendly Garden:

1. Provide Nectar Sources - flowering plants including Butterfly Bush, Cosmos, Lantana, Allium, Coneflower, Joe Pye Weed, Liatris (blazing star), Sunflower, Salvia, Zinnia...and many more 2. Site Plants Correctly - Butterflies feed on flowers in the sun, so place pollinator plants where they will will receive full sun from mid-morning to mid-afternoon. If you garden is shady, but you have a vegetable garden in a full-sun site, interplant your vegetables with annuals such as Zinnias, Sunflowers, and Cosmos. This is good for butterflies, and also brings some color into your vegetabe garden! 3. Don't Use Pesticides!!! They kill all insects, including the good ones. 4. Provide Food for the Caterpillars - Monarch caterpillars pretty much only eat Milkweed. Common milkweed is a favorite food source, but it is pretty invasive. Other species, including Butterfly milkweed, are good food sources, and also look nice in the landscape. 5. Provide Water - Butterflies like to drink water and minerals from moist sand or puddles. You can add this feature to your garden by placing a dish of sand on the ground and keeping it moist. If you search online, you can find other creative ideas for butterfly puddles in the garden. After you have created your excellent butterfly habitat - you can register it with the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge! 
Selecting a Contractor Bumblebee on Walker's Low Catmint

What about stinging?

Most bees, if left alone, will not sting. They are simply going about their business collecting pollen and nectar, and if you don't bother them, they will not bother you. (If you are extremely allergic to bees you may not want to try to attract them). Bees and wasps protecting their nests can be dangerous, but visiting pollinators are not.
Brocolli Flowers attract Pollinators Zinnia and Marigold Interplanted with Vegetables Monarch Butterfly on Marigold Butterfly on Butterfly Bush Flowers Monarch on Joe Pye Weed Flowers Butterfly Milkweed Flowers Monarch Caterpillar on Butterfly Milkweed
Brocolli left to flower attracts pollinators for nearby plants
Zinnias and marigolds interplanted with vegetables
Monarch caterpillar on butterfly milkweed
Butterfly Milkweed in Bloom
Monarch on Joe Pye Weed
Bumblebee on Bee Balm Flower
© 2017 Sunrise Gardens LLC
203 E Beloit St Darien, WI 53114    (262) 882-0811     adam@sunrisegardensllc.com

pollinator gardens

Improve Fruits and Vegetables by Attracting

Pollinators

If you have a vegetable garden or fruit trees and shrubs, they will benefit from pollinator-friendly plants nearby. If you find you have poor yields, especially with cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, or typical fruit trees- increased pollination may help. Including (but not limited to) Sweet Alyssum (annual) Mint family (catmint, mints, basil... Carrot family (carrots, parsley, dill...) Aster family (asters, sunflowers, zinnia...)

 Why are Pollinators

Important?

75% of all of our food crops require or benefit from insect pollination Pollinators are disappearing at alarming rates because of disease, habitat loss, and pesticide use. Bees are the most well known pollinators, but there are also many species of butterflies, moths, flies, wasps, beetles, birds, bats, and even some mammals.

Use Your Landscape to help pollinators

Eliminate or reduce your pesticide use Add to your landscape flowering plants that attract pollinators Provide a water source- even a small birdbath or small water feature will help

Monarch Butterflies

The Monarch is one of our most recognizable American butterflies. Loss of habitat and food supply have greatly decreased the population of this amazing migrating butterfly. Fortunately, we can do something to help this species, and all pollinators by planting pollinator friendly gardens. There are even funds for schools, communities, and businesses to aid in Monarch conservation efforts (more info here).

Creating a Monarch

Friendly Garden:

1. Provide Nectar Sources - flowering plants including Butterfly Bush, Cosmos, Lantana, Allium, Coneflower, Joe Pye Weed, Liatris (blazing star), Sunflower, Salvia, Zinnia...and many more 2. Site Plants Correctly - Butterflies feed on flowers in the sun, so place pollinator plants where they will will receive full sun from mid-morning to mid-afternoon. If you garden is shady, but you have a vegetable garden in a full-sun site, interplant your vegetables with annuals such as Zinnias, Sunflowers, and Cosmos. This is good for butterflies, and also brings some color into your vegetabe garden! 3. Don't Use Pesticides!!!  They kill all insects, including the good ones. 4. Provide Food for the Caterpillars - Monarch caterpillars pretty much only eat Milkweed. Common milkweed is a favorite food source, but it is pretty invasive. Other species, including Butterfly milkweed, are good food sources, and also look nice in the landscape. 5. Provide Water - Butterflies like to drink water and minerals from moist sand or puddles. You can add this feature to your garden by placing a dish of sand on the ground and keeping it moist. If you search online, you can find other creative ideas for butterfly puddles in the garden. After you have created your excellent butterfly habitat - you can register it with the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge! 
Brocolli left to flower attracts pollinators for nearby plants
Zinnias and marigolds interplanted with vegetables
Monarch caterpillar on butterfly milkweed
(262) 882-0811
(262) 882-0811